Injection innovation for safety, equity, and access – at a disruptive price.
 

The End Of An Era

 
 
shutterstock_1165761844.jpg
 
shutterstock_735839728.jpg

THE MISSING 20%

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Each year, according to the WHO, 1 in 5 children are not fully vaccinated. Multi-dose vials and syringes have helped the world make enormous progress toward vaccinating entire populations and saving millions of lives.

Today’s challenge is to cover the remaining 20% of children. However, this cannot be achieved with vaccines presented in multi-dose vials.

This format, although low-cost, is severely vulnerable to wastage and contamination. In addition, when vaccines and essential medicines are delivered in multi-dose vials, it is more difficult for them to “go the last mile” to reach remote communities.

 
Marc_17.png

WHY DO UNSAFE MEDICAL INJECTIONS KEEP HAPPENING?

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

In low- and middle-income countries, up to 70% of injections are given with reused syringes, says the WHO. But reused syringes are contaminated, often with dangerous pathogens. When they are filled from a multi-dose vial, all future injections from that vial can be contaminated as well.

Why do trained clinical workers take the risk of reusing syringes?

Two reasons. First, in low-income economies, there is what the WHO calls an “ingrained” habit of saving and reusing medical materials rather than discarding what appears to be a perfectly good piece of equipment.

Second, many clinical workers mistakenly believe that washing a used syringe in alcohol or putting it in boiling water will disinfect the device. Unfortunately, that’s not true.

 
 

GLASS: ENERGY-HUNGRY
AND SLOW

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Glass manufacturing is one of the world’s most energy-intensive industries, accounting for 1% of total industrial energy use.

The lengthy manufacturing process for glass vials creates slow response times when outbreaks occur. That can cost lives.

 
 
smoke stacks.jpg
 
shutterstock_735837637.jpg

COST IS KING

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Despite their drawbacks, multi-dose vials are used in a majority of injections in many low- and middle-income countries.

Why? Because their low cost (as compared with single-dose vials and traditional cPADs) means that governments can vaccinate many more people on the same budget, even though the risks of disease transmission are higher.

 
Screen Shot 2018-09-26 at 4.22.36 PM.png

WE NEED A BETTER WAY

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

What sort of product is needed to fully vaccinate the remaining 20% of the world’s children and eliminate reusable syringes?

The world needs a single-dose device that can travel easily, be manufactured quickly, is simple to use and impossible to reuse. And, its cost per dose must meet or beat that of a 10-dose vial.

Introducing the ApiJect Soft Syringe